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The final (for now) solid 3.03 percent annualized real GDP growth figure for the second quarter benefited slightly on a sequential basis by a drop in the inflation-adjusted trade deficit to $613.6 billion – the lowest such level since the third quarter of 2016 ($557.3 billion). Trade’s role as a quarterly growth engine, however (adding 0.21 percentage points) decreased to its smallest on a relative basis since the third quarter of 2014 (when its fueled 0.28 percentage points of 5.11 percent annualized growth).

New quarterly constant-dollar records were all achieved for total exports and goods exports, and for all import categories. For total imports and goods imports, these records were their fifth straight. Real services exports increased sequentially at their fastest annualized rate (6.2 percent) since the first quarter of 2013 (7.1 percent). But services imports hit their eleventh straight quarterly record ($498.2 billion).

Trade’s subtraction from cumulative recovery-era real growth remained considerable in the second quarter, but shrank sequentially both in toto (from 10.04 percent in the first quarter to 9.24 percent) and in terms of the Made in Washington deficit that tracks trade flows heavily influenced by trade policy (from 17.40 percent to 17.30 percent).

Here are the trade highlights from Thursday morning’s GDP report from the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Economic Analysis:

>The final read on second quarter economic growth produced an unusual mix of results given all the attention focused on President Trump’s stated resolve to reform U.S. trade policy. On the one hand, a sequential drop in the inflation-adjusted trade deficit to $613.6 billion (its lowest level since the $557.3 billion in the third quarter of 2016) helped lift annualized quarterly growth to 3.03 percent – the best such result since the first quarter of 2015 (3.20 percent).

>On the other hand, trade’s positive contribution to growth was its smallest on a relative basis (adding 0.21 percentage points) since the third quarter of 2014 (0.28 percentage points out of 5.11 percent annualized real growth).

>On a stand-still basis, new quarterly records were set for nearly all after-inflation categories of trade flows, including across the board on imports.

>Real total exports increased by 3.48 percent sequentially at an annual rate, from $2.1623 trillion annualized to $2.1811 trillion – their second straight all-time high.

>Real goods exports also hit their second straight quarterly record, improving by 2.17 percent annualized, from $1.4923 trillion annualized in the first quarter to $1.5004 trillion.

>Real services exports rose quarter-to-quarter at their fastest annual rate (6.01 percent) since the first quarter of 2013 (6.86 percent). But their $682.3 billion total fell short of the record of $684.9 billion set in the second quarter of 2015.

>Real combined goods and services imports in the second quarter rose sequentially at their slowest annualized rate (1.48 percent) since the second quarter of 2016 (0.39 percent). But their $2.7948 trillion figure was still their fifth straight quarterly record.

>Real goods imports set their fifth straight quarterly record, too. They rose by just 1.33 percent on an annual basis (the slowest pace since the third quarter of 2016’s 1.23 percent) to hit $2.7948 trillion annualized.

>As for real services imports, they set their eleventh straight quarterly record ($498.2 billion) – even though they advanced by a mere 2.18 percent annualized (the slowest such pace since the 1.01 percent annual growth in the second quarter of 2016).

>The new GDP figures showed that trade kept subtracting from America’s cumulative growth during te current economic recovery, but that the growth drag lightened by both major measures.

>As of these final second quarter results, the increase in the inflation-adjusted trade deficit since the second quarter of 2009 (when the recovery officially began) has sliced $247.3 billion from the real gross domestic product’s improvement – a growth drag of 9.24 percent.

>As of the first quarter, this growth drag was 10.04 percent, or $255.9 billion.

>The bite into growth from the Made in Washington trade deficit’s increase was much greater, but diminished as well.

>The post-second quarter, 2009 widening in this trade deficit – which strips out trade in energy and services and focuses on import and export flows heavily influenced by trade policy – cost the economy $462.8 billion, resulting in a growth drag of 17.30 percent.

>The Made in Washington trade deficit’s growth drag in the first quarter was 17.40 percent, or $443.3 billion.